The notion that abdominal obesity is the most dangerous kind isn't new. Back in the 1940s, the French physician Jean Vague observed that some obese patients had normal blood chemistry, while some moderately overweight patients showed serious abnormalities that predisposed them to heart disease or diabetes. Almost always, the latter patients carried their fat around their middles. And, almost always, they were men.
They're not FDA-regulated and therefore, what they do in your body can’t really be determined. If you’re thinking, So what?! I want to lose weight quickly and it’s okay if it doesn’t work, I still want to try! Listen up: Outside the wide range of potential pitfalls, I have much larger concern about the long-term psychological effects that come from "detoxing." The more we see words like "cleanse" and "detox," the more likely we are to believe there’s something beneficial, scientific, or "proven" about it (there isn’t). It’s a elitist shame-trigger, and its wholly unrealistic from both a physiological and mental well-being standpoint.
"When we’re lacking in sleep, our body’s hormones get thrown off balance which can impact our hunger levels the next day. We all have two hormones that affect our appetite: ghrelin and leptin. When we don’t get enough sleep, our ghrelin levels (the hormone that makes us feel hungry) rise, and our leptin levels (the hormone that makes us feel full) drop. This means that when we’re awake, we tend to eat more but feel less satisfied. Try going to bed a little earlier than usual to avoid this imbalance and remember to remove any distractions that might prevent you from nodding off."
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